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24 July 2014

No-Carb Bread

23 November 2013

Rhubarb Steak

21 November 2013

Tuna Salad

21 November 2013

Dakos

18 June 2013

Shish Kebabs

17 June 2013

Asparagus with Pancakes

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Pizza

Pizza dough to serve 4:

1 cantuna fish in oil
1egg
50 g_(2 oz)gluten
50 g_(2 oz)almond flour
Salt, pepper

One of the first low-carb recipes we tried was a tuna-based pizza dough. We followed the recipe (from the University of Würzburg) closely, and were disappointed. The result was nothing like pizza - more like an omelet. It wasn't crispy at all and it tasted like egg. Contrary to what we'd expected, though, the tuna worked well.

That's why we've tackled the recipe again, and after several attempts, I think the results are fairly impressive. We drained and pureed a can of tuna, then added an egg. For a good consistency, we then kneaded in 50 g_(2 oz) (2 oz) gluten and 50 g_(2 oz) (2 oz) almond flour. description It also works just to use 100 g_(4 oz) (2 oz) of gluten. This makes a nice smooth dough that can be rolled very thin (assuming that you pureed the tuna very finely!).

Pre-baked the dough for 10 minutes at 360° F (180° C), then add the toppings. We baked the pizza at 400° F (220° C) and it was done in 15 minutes. Crispy, succulent, spicy, Italian - in short:

Delicious!


descriptionAnyone who's made a pizza before can skip this next part. For those whose pizza experience is limited to opening flat cardboard boxes, here are some tips for adding toppings.

A pizza's taste stands or falls by the tomato sauce. Even purists who make everything else from scratch will use canned tomatoes here. They can't compare to fully-ripened, aromatic fresh tomatoes. But first, I press a clove of garlic and brown it in some olive oil. Next, I add the can of tomatoes. Then I season it with a bouillon cube (or just salt and pepper) and herbs. Naturally, it tastes best with freshly-cut oregano, basil, thyme, and sage. Now let it all simmer uncovered at low heat for at least 30 minutes, ideally 1-2 hours.

Tomato Sauce for Pizza

1 can (340 g)tomatoes
1clove of garlic
1bouillon cube
Salt, pepper, oregano, basil, thyme, and sage

The tomato sauce always comes first when topping a pizza. Then you can add ham or salami, followed by onions, olives, peppers, capers, mushrooms, etc. Finally, add the cheese. Cheese is another opportunity for experimentation. Mozzarella is a must. If you like a stronger flavor, try Gorgonzola or Emmentaler. Aged Gouda also has a strong taste. An especially fresh combination is goat cheese and Gouda.

In closing, here's a tip for everyone who thinks Italians skimp on pizza toppings so that they can afford sports cars. If the toppings are too thick, the pizza will burn on the outside and be undercooked on the inside. So I'd rather go easy on the toppings (I know, it's hard for me, too) and be able to eat another slice!

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